UVIC CS Seminar: UD-GEM: A Multi-Path Routing Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Networks Mon 5/11

April 22, 2009 at 1:50 pm (Uncategorized) ()

D E P A R T M E N T O F C O M P U T E R S C I E N C E
S E M I N A R

Topic: UD-GEM: A Multi-Path Routing Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Networks

Presented By: Q. Ye, Assistant Professor
From: Department of Computer Science and Information Technology, University of Prince Edward Island
Biography: Qiang Ye is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Information Technology at the University of Prince Edward Island. His current research interests lie in the area of communication networks in
general. Specifically, he is interested in Network Reliability and Security (Wireline and Wireless), Protocol Modeling and Evaluation, and the Application of Formal Methods to Network Protocols. He received a Ph.D. in Computing Science from the University of Alberta in 2007. His M.Engr. and B. Engr. in Computer Science and Technology are from Harbin Institute of Technology, P.R. China. He is a Member of IEEE and ACM.

Sponsored By: J. Pan, Assistant Professor
From: Department of Computer Science, University of Victoria

Date: Monday, May 11, 2009
Time: 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Location: Engineering and Computer Science Building (ECS), Room # 660

ABSTRACT:
GEM is an ingenious routing algorithm for wireless sensor networks that is based on the idea of graph embedding. However, it cannot survive edge failures well because reliability was not taken into consideration seriously when it was designed. In this paper, we propose UD-GEM, a GEM-based multipath routing algorithm that improves the reliability performance of GEM significantly. Specifically, in the case that 2% of all edges in the network fail to transfer packets and there are 900 sensor nodes in the experimental network, GEM leads to a path error rate of 12%
while UD-GEM only results in a path error rate of 1%.

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Fairfield Artists Studio Tour – 2009

April 21, 2009 at 12:35 pm (Uncategorized) ()

Fairfield Artists Studio Tour – 2009

Tour — April 25 & 26 from 11 – 4 p.m.
Gala Opening — Friday April 24, 7-9 p.m. (Garry Oak Room, 1335 Thurlow Road)

Come out and experience the creative works of over fifty area artists while enjoying a walk through Fairfield at the Seventh Annual Fairfield Artists Studio Tour. Check out their work at Fairfield Artist Studio Tour Website

For the tour many of the participating artists will invite you into their private studios. You’ll need both days to see them all!

Other artists and their work will be featured in group shows. Saturday April 25th and Sunday April 26th – 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at:

* Fairfield Community Association, 1330 Fairfield Road
* Garry Oak Room, 1335 Thurlow Road
* Fairfield United Church, 1303 Fairfield Road
* Fairfield New Horizon, 380 Cook Street

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UVic CS Seminar: “Coordination in Software Engineering by Bridging Formal and Informal Practices” on April 23, 2009

April 16, 2009 at 2:43 pm (Uncategorized)

D E P A R T M E N T O F C O M P U T E R S C I E N C E
S E M I N A R

Topic: Coordination in Software Engineering by Bridging Formal and Informal Practices

Presented By: Dr. A. Sarma, Post Doctoral Fellow
From: Institute for Software Research in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University
Biography: She holds a joint B.S. and M.S. degree in Management Studies from the Birla Institute of Technology and Sciences, Pilani, India, and a Ph.D. degree in Information and Computer Science from the University of California, Irvine. Her research interests lie primarily in the intersection of software engineering and computer-supported cooperative work, focusing on understanding and supporting coordination as an interplay of people and technology. Her research is driven by a strong desire to offer practical solutions to real-world problems through the construction of novel software tools and environments. At the same time, her research is framed by a pursuit of novel theoretical contributions that derive from deep understandings of the field.

Sponsored By: Dr. M. Storey, Associate Professor and CRC Chair (Tier I)
From: Department of Computer Science, University of Victoria

Start Date: Thursday, April 23, 2009
Time: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Location: Engineering and Computer Science Building (ECS), Room # 504

ABSTRACT:
My research focuses on understanding how coordination in software development takes place and can be better supported as an interplay of people and technology. Towards this goal, I have designed,implemented, and evaluated different coordination tools. In this talk, I will discuss my experiences in building two of these tools, Palantír and Tesseract. Palantír augments existing configuration management systems with workspace awareness to inform developers of ongoing changes and their effects so as to prompt users to self-coordinate. Results from user experiments demonstrate that, as compared to not using Palantír, the use of Palantír: (1) leads to both early detection and early resolution of a larger number of conflicts, (2) leaves fewer conflicts unresolved in the code base that was ultimately checked in, and (3) involves reasonable overhead. Tesseract is an interactive environment that enables developers to explore and understand various relationships that exist among different project entities and such as artifacts, developers, bugs, and communications in a software project. Formative evaluations of Tesseract have shown that users can very quickly understand the use of cross-linked displays and found the tool to be useful in learning about a new project.

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Agency Research’s Green Action Survey

April 11, 2009 at 1:59 pm (Community) (, )

We recently received heads-up from Kim Nuernberger at Victoria-based Agency Research Consultants that they have a new Green Action Survey for Victoria residents to take. From Kim’s email:

We feel there is a need for the collection and dissemination of local opinions and local voices on topics of importance to our communities. In order to fill this need, and promote what we love to do, we have created a series of local issues surveys. The information gathered through these surveys is shared with our survey participants, members of the local media, and made accessible through our website at http://www.agencyresearch.ca. I can assure you that we are not funded to do this research and that the information we collect is for research purposes only. We follow all federal and provincial privacy regulations and protect the confidentiality of those who participate in our surveys.

Our latest survey is our Green Action Survey. This brief survey takes about 5 minutes to complete and explores local opinions and actions on the environment.

Since their research seems like a good way to help the community figure out our priorities and interests, we wanted to pass their information along and encourage users of MetroCascade and all Victoria residents to take a look at the site and perhaps take a survey.

(Posted by Yule)

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The Software Engineer Meets the Lawyer at UVic Computer Science on 4/8

April 1, 2009 at 9:38 am (Uncategorized) ()

SENGCO SEMINAR

DATE: Wednesday, April 8th, 2009

TIME: 12:00 p.m. to 1.30 p.m.

PLACE: Engineering Office Wing Building (EOW), Room #430

TITLE: The Software Engineer Meets the Lawyer: The Legal Challenges of Software Reuse
SPEAKER: Daniel German, Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science University of Victoria.

ABSTRACT:

Software is protected by copyright law in a similar way in which music and literature are. Until recently this was an issue that concerned few.

The advent of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) changed this. FOSS licenses are legal documents that give access to the source code of a program and permit its reuse, modification, and redistribution. Suddenly developers and organizations alike, both FOSS and proprietary, realized that they need to understand the conditions and grants embodied in a FOSS license of software that they might want to reuse.

In this talk, I will describe our ICSE’09 paper regarding software licensing. In the first part I’ll describe the problem of “license mismatch”, when two or more FOSS components are used in a system, and the licenses of these components have conditions that cannot be simultaneously satisfied. FOSS developers have found what appear to be legal workarounds to solve this problem, and we document them in a system of patterns that I will describe.

In the second part I will describe “Code Siblings”. A code sibling is a fragment of code that is copied from one application to another, and hence evolves under a completely different environment than the original fragment. To exist, the license of the original fragment must allow the creation of the sibling. I will describe a study of the FOSS Unix kernels that is centred around the legal aspects of their code siblings.

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