CS Seminar OpenNet: Dynamic Deployment of New Network Architectures 6/2

May 27, 2009 at 3:59 pm (Uncategorized) ()

D E P A R T M E N T O F C O M P U T E R S C I E N C E
S E M I N A R

Topic: OpenNet: Dynamic Deployment of New Network Architectures

Presented By: P. McGeer, Principal Scientist, Hewlett Packard Laboratories
From: Adjunct Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of Victoria

Date: Tuesday, June 02, 2009
Time: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Location: Engineering and Computer Science Building, (ECS), Room # 660

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CS Seminar Thinking Interactively with Visualization 5/29

May 20, 2009 at 11:09 am (Uncategorized) ()

D E P A R T M E N T O F C O M P U T E R S C I E N C E
S E M I N A R

Topic: Thinking Interactively with Visualization

Presented By: Remco Chang, Research Scientist
From: Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina and Member of the Charlotte Visualization Center
Biography: Remco Chang is a Research Associate in the department of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte and a member of the Charlotte Visualization Center. His research interests include interactions in visualization, geospatial and urban visualization, visual analytics, and information provenance. Chang received a Master’s degree from Brown University in computer science and Bachelor degrees in Computer Science and Economics from Johns Hopkins University. Contact him at rchang@uncc.edu.

Sponsored By: Melanie Tory, Assistant Professor
From: Department of Computer Science, University of Victoria

Date: Friday, May 29, 2009
Time: 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
Location: Engineering and Computer Science Building, (ECS), Room # 660

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CS Seminar Cake: A Language for Adapting and Linking Mismatched Binary Components 5/26

May 20, 2009 at 11:04 am (Uncategorized) ()

D E P A R T M E N T O F C O M P U T E R S C I E N C E
S E M I N A R

Topic: Cake: A Language for Adapting and Linking Mismatched Binary Components

Presented By: Stephen Kell, Ph.D.
From: Networks and Operating Systems group, University of Cambridge
Biography: Stephen Kell is a third-year PhD student at the University of Cambridge’s Computer Laboratory, based (loosely) in the Networks and Operating Systems group and supervised by Dr. David J. Greaves. His interests span many aspects of programming tools, languages, runtimes, operating systems and networks, with an emphasis on their interaction with human beings (primarily programmers) and a special interest in issues of adaptation, evolution migration and compatibility. Before starting his Ph.D. he was a research assistant at the Laboratory, working on virtualization and system security. He received the B.A. in 2005, also from the University of Cambridge.

Sponsored By: Yvonne Coady, Associate Professor
From: Department of Computer Science, University of Victoria

Date: Tuesday, May 26, 2009
Time: 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Location: Engineering and Computer Science Building, (ECS) Room # 660

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Jazz Vesper at the Church of the Advent on 5/17

May 12, 2009 at 5:10 pm (Uncategorized) ()

VOCAL VESPERS (Jazz Vespers) at the Church of the Advent – sunday night at 7 p.m. – our fourth Season finale. See formatted poster attached. ken Gray

Greater Victoria’s hippest church closes off its hugely successful Jazz Vespers Series on Sunday, May 17 with powerhouse vocalist Emily Braden and her trio. Come and witness a rare “Vocal Vespers” at the Church of the Advent as the soulful and dynamic Braden brings her jazz and gospel roots to this increasingly popular musical experience.

Years of beautiful hard work has allowed Emily Braden to develop a truly unique style. With her powerful range and soulful sound, she explores everything from gospel wails, confident blues, hard funk and feverish vocal improvisations to heartfelt, subtle ballads. Emily’s career as a versatile and engaging soloist is rooted in an early passion for powerhouse vocalists such as Ella Fitzgerald and Aretha Franklin. She recalls hours spent at a young age memorizing classic vocal recordings and scat solos.

Originally from Boise, Idaho, the now-27-year old moved to Victoria, BC in 2002 to begin a four-year mentorship with the legendary jazz musician Louise Rose. Her instrument-like improvisations and affinity for the blues gained the attention of world music artist and Canadian Juno-award nominee, Harry Manx. With Manx, Emily has recorded on three albums and toured across Canada.

Highlights from her musical career include headlining Victoria Jazzfests closing show, when she was joined on stage with a touring Wynton Marsalis and members of his Lincoln Centre Orchestra. Additionally,

Emily was recently selected to perform at the historical Apollo Theater in New York City as a competitor in the world renowned talent show, Apollo Amateur Night. The first round takes place on Wednesday, May 6th of this year.

Upcoming projects include the release of Emily’s debut solo album, Soul Walk in the summer of 2009. Recorded this fall in New York City with pianist, composer and producer Misha Piatigorsky, the album marks the debut of Emily’s original compositions and promises to be a bold introduction to an exciting career.

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Kenneth J. Gray

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UVic CS Seminar: “Coordination in Software Engineering by Bridging Formal and Informal Practices” on May 25, 2009

May 8, 2009 at 11:59 am (lecture)

D E P A R T M E N T O F C O M P U T E R S C I E N C E
S E M I N A R

Topic: Coordination in Software Engineering by Bridging Formal and Informal Practices

Presented By: Dr. A. Sarma, Post Doctoral Fellow
From: Institute for Software Research in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University
Biography: She holds a joint B.S. and M.S. degree in Management Studies from the Birla Institute of Technology and Sciences, Pilani, India, and a Ph.D. degree in Information and Computer Science from the University of California, Irvine. Her research interests lie primarily in the intersection of software engineering and computer-supported cooperative work, focusing on understanding and supporting coordination as an interplay of people and technology. Her research is driven by a strong desire to offer practical solutions to real-world problems through the construction of novel software tools and environments. At the same time, her research is framed by a pursuit of novel theoretical contributions that derive from deep understandings of the field.

Sponsored By: Dr. M. Storey, Associate Professor and CRC Chair (Tier I)
From: Department of Computer Science, University of Victoria

Start Date: Monday, May 25, 2009
Time: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Location: Engineering and Computer Science Building (ECS), Room # 660

ABSTRACT:
My research focuses on understanding how coordination in software development takes place and can be better supported as an interplay of people and technology. Towards this goal, I have designed,implemented, and evaluated different coordination tools. In this talk, I will discuss my experiences in building two of these tools, Palantír and Tesseract. Palantír augments existing configuration management systems with workspace awareness to inform developers of ongoing changes and their effects so as to prompt users to self-coordinate. Results from user experiments demonstrate that, as compared to not using Palantír, the use of Palantír: (1) leads to both early detection and early resolution of a larger number of conflicts, (2) leaves fewer conflicts unresolved in the code base that was ultimately checked in, and (3) involves reasonable overhead. Tesseract is an interactive environment that enables developers to explore and understand various relationships that exist among different project entities and such as artifacts, developers, bugs, and communications in a software project. Formative evaluations of Tesseract have shown that users can very quickly understand the use of cross-linked displays and found the tool to be useful in learning about a new project.

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