Dept. of CS Colloquium Recent Research at ETS, Montreal in Visualizing Trees and Graphs 6/25

June 22, 2010 at 10:38 am (lecture)

D E P A R T M E N T   O F   C O M P U T E R   S C I E N C E
C O L L O Q U I U M

Topic: Recent Research at ETS, Montreal in Visualizing Trees and Graphs

Presented By: Michael McGuffin
From: École de technologie supérieure (ETS), Montreal, Quebec
Biography: Michael McGuffin is an Assistant Professor at ETS (“École de technologie supérieure”) in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. His research interests lie in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), currently focusing on information visualization. He was previously a post-doctoral researcher at the Ontario Cancer Institute (OCI; Division of Signaling Biology), working on visualization and user interfaces for bioinformatics, within Dr. Igor Jurisica’s lab. He completed a Ph.D. in Computer Science at the University of Toronto, where his homebase was the Dynamic Graphics Project (DGP) lab, and where his advisor was Prof. Ravin Balakrishnan. During his Ph.D. studies, he spent three years as an IBM CAS Fellowship Student at the IBM Toronto Lab. He also holds a Master of Science (M.Sc.) in Computer Science from University of Toronto, and an Honours Bachelor of Applied Science (B.A.Sc.) in Computer Engineering with Software Engineering Option from the University of Waterloo. Prior to his graduate studies, he worked as a software developer, creating user interfaces at Alias|wavefront in Toronto and Discreet Logic in Montreal (both companies now part of Autodesk), and CAE in Montreal. Michael hails from Chibougamau, Quebec, Canada; enjoys living in a trilingual household; and dabbles in piano and karate.

Sponsored By: Dr. Melanie Tory, Assistant Professor
From: Department of Computer Science, University of Victoria

Date: Friday, June 25, 2010
Time: 10:30 am – 11:30 am
Location: Engineering Office Wing (EOW), Room 430

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Dept. of CS Colloquium Self-Assembling Distributed Internet Software 6/3

May 21, 2010 at 11:17 am (lecture)

D E P A R T M E N T   O F   C O M P U T E R   S C I E N C E  C O L L O Q U I U M

Topic: Self-Assembling Distributed Internet Software

Presented By: Dr. Yuriy Brun
From: University of Washingon, USA
Biography: Yuriy Brun is an NSF CRA postdoctoral Computing Innovation Fellow at the University of Washington in Seattle, WA, USA. He received his Ph.D. degree in 2008 from the University of Southern California, as an Andrew Viterbi Fellow, and his M.Eng. degree in 2003 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His doctoral research was a finalist in the ACM Doctoral Dissertation Competition in 2008. Brun’s research interests are in the area of engineering self-adaptive and self-managing software systems. His work combines theoretical computer science approaches to modeling nature-inspired algorithms and software engineering approaches to leveraging those algorithms to build systems.

Sponsored By: Dr. Hausi Muller, Professor and Associate Dean Research
From: Department of Computer Science, University of Victoria

Date: Thursday, June 03, 2010

Time: 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

Location: Engineering and Computer Science Building (ECS), Room 660

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Dept. of CS Colloquium Recovered Unified Process Views 5/21

May 17, 2010 at 10:40 am (lecture, Uncategorized)

D E P A R T M E N T   O F   C O M P U T E R   S C I E N C E
C O L L O Q U I U M

Topic: Recovered Unified Process Views

Presented By: Abram Hindle
From: University of Waterloo
Biography: Abram Hindle is a Ph D candidate at the University of Waterloo.

Sponsored By: Daniel German

Date: Friday, May 21, 2010
Time: 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm
Location: Engineering and Computer Science Building (ECS)  660

ABSTRACT:
Abstract: The development process for a given software system is acombination of an idealized, prescribed model and a messy set of ad hoc practices.  To some degree, process compliance can be enforced by supporting tools that require various steps be followed in order; however, this approach is often perceived as heavyweight and inflexible by developers, who generally prefer that tools support their desired work habits rather than limit their choices.  An alternative approach to monitoring process compliance is to instrument the various tools and repositories that developers use — such as source control systems, bug-trackers, and mailing-list archives — and to build models of the de facto development process through observation, analysis, and inference.  In this talk, we present a technique for recovering a project’s software development processes from a variety of existing artifacts.  We first apply unsupervised and supervised techniques — including word-bags, topic analysis, summary statistics, and Bayesian classifiers — to annotate software artifacts by related topics, maintenance types, and non-functional requirements.  We map the analysis results onto a time-line Unified Process development model, which we call Recovered
Unified Process Views.  We demonstrate our approach for
extracting these process views from two case studies: FreeBSD and SQLite.

Announced By: Carol Harkness

Computer Science Dept., University of Victoria
Engineering/Computer Science Building (ECS), Room 504

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Dept. of CS Seminar Automated Testing of Modern Web Applications 4/20

April 12, 2010 at 12:34 pm (lecture)

D E P A R T M E N T   O F   C O M P U T E R   S C I E N C E
S E M I N A R

Topic: Automated Testing of Modern Web Applications

Presented By: Arie van Deursen, Professor and Ali Mesbah, Delft University of Technology
From: Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands
Biography: Arie van Deursen is a professor at Delft University of Technology where he leads the Software Engineering Research Group.  His research interests include software testing, software architecture, program comprehension, and the use of Web 2.0 techniques in software engineering.  He is co-founder of the Software Improvement Group, an Amsterdam-based company specialized in software risk assessments and software quality monitoring.  He is currently on a 5 month sabbatical leave at the University of Victoria, working with the CHISEL group in the area of collaborative software engineering.

Sponsored By: Dr. M. Storey, Professor and CRC Chair,
From: Department of Computer Science, University of Victoria

Date: Tuesday, April 20, 2010
Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Location: Engineering and Computer Science Building (ECS), Room # 660

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Dept. of CS Seminar Creating First-Person, Interactive Narratives Apr 1

March 30, 2010 at 9:50 am (lecture)

D E P A R T M E N T   O F   C O M P U T E R   S C I E N C E
S E M I N A R

Topic: Creating First-Person, Interactive Narratives

Presented By: Andrew Glassner, Ph.D., Writer, Director, Consultant
From: Coyote Wind Studios, Seattle, WA. USA
Biography: Dr. Andrew Glassner, Ph.D., Computer Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC., is a writer, director, and a consultant in video game design.

He carried out research in 3D computer graphics at Bell Communications Research, the IBM Watson Research Lab, Xerox PARC, and Microsoft Research.  He has written many papers and books in computer graphics, including the textbook “Principles of Digital Image Synthesis” and the three volumes of “Andrew Glassner’s Notebook.”

He created the “Graphics Gems” series, founded the Journal of Graphics Tools, served as Editor-in-Chief of ACM Transactions on Graphics, and was Papers Chair for SIGGRAPH ’94, where he created the Sketches venue.  As a writer-director, he created, wrote, and directed the multiplayer Internet game “Dead Air” for the Microsoft Network, as well as the animated short “Chicken Crossing” and several live-action short films.  His book “Interactive Storytelling” speaks to the future of narrative, and his upcoming book on “Processing for Artists and Designers” invites a new generation of creators to embrace software as an artistic medium.  Glassner is now a full-time writer-director, and a consultant in storytelling and interactive fiction to the computer game and online entertainment industries.

Sponsored By: Dr. Brian Wyvill, Professor and Canada Research Chair
From: Department  of Computer Science,  University of Victoria

Date: Thursday, April 01, 2010
Time: 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Location: Engineering and Computer Science Building (ECS), Room # 660

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Dept. of CS Seminar Blurring Boundaries 2/15

February 10, 2010 at 11:15 am (lecture)

D E P A R T M E N T   O F   C O M P U T E R   S C I E N C E
S E M I N A R

Topic: Blurring Boundaries: Mixing Input Modes to Enhance Interactions in Digital Environments

Presented By: P. Irani, Associate Professor
From: Department of Computer Science, University of Manitoba
Biography: Pourang Irani is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Manitoba, where he conducts research in the area of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). He works on a variety of fields in HCI, including Information Visualization, Interaction Techniques, Animated Displays, Document Navigation, Interfaces for Ubiquitous Devices, Input Devices, Gaming Applications, Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW).

Sponsored By: M. Tory, Assistant Professor
From: Department of Computer Science, University of Victoria

Date: Monday, February 15, 2010
Time: 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Location: Engineering and Computer Science Building (ECS),Room # 660

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Dept. of CS Chasing the Negawatt 2/5

February 4, 2010 at 11:41 am (lecture)

D E P A R T M E N T   O F   C O M P U T E R   S C I E N C E
S E M I N A R

Topic: Chasing the Negawatt: Human-Centred Systems for Sustainable Living

Presented By: L.Bartram, Assistant Professor  and R. Woodbury, Professor
From: School of Interactive Arts and Technology, Simon Fraser University, B.C.
Biography: Lyn Bartram is an Assistant Professor in the School of Interactive Arts and Technology at Simon Fraser University (SFU), where she is a co-founder and Director of the HVILab. Her theoretical research interests span perception, computational aesthetics and design principles – all applied to information visualization and human-computer interaction. In particular she is interested in how the rich visual modality of motion and animation can be used in information visualization and affective interfaces.

Rob Woodbury is a Professor also in the School of Interactive Arts and Technology at Simon Fraser University. His research interests include design space exploration, parametric modeling, design grammars, design patterns, design collaboration, visual analytics, knowledge visualization, and research methods for design.

Sponsored By: M. Tory, Assistant Professor

From: Department of Computer Science, University of Victoria

Date: Friday, February 05, 2010
Time: 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Location: Engineering and Computer Science Building, (ECS) Room # 660

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Dept. of CS Seminar Classifying Web Pages by Genre 2/15

February 4, 2010 at 11:35 am (lecture)

D E P A R T M E N T   O F   C O M P U T E R   S C I E N C E
S E M I N A R

Topic: Classifying Web Pages by Genre

Presented By: J. Mason,  PhD
From: Faculty of Computer Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
Biography: Jane Mason recently completed her PhD with the Faculty of Computer Science at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Her PhD research investigated the classification of Web pages by genre, using n-gram representations of the Web pages and Web page genres. She has been the recipient of numerous scholarships and research awards, including first place(graduate division)in the grand finals of the
2005 ACM international student research competition. Her research interests include machine learning, natural language processing, information retrieval, and numerical linear algebra.

Sponsored By: M. Storey, Professor and CRC Chair
From: Department of Computer Science, University of Victoria

Date: Monday, February 15, 2010
Time: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Location: Engineering and Computer Science Building (ECS), Room 660

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Dept. of CS Colloquium From DNA to Jay-Z 2/10

January 29, 2010 at 4:18 pm (lecture) ()

D E P A R T M E N T   O F   C O M P U T E R   S C I E N C E
C O L L O Q U I U M

Topic: From DNA to Jay-Z: How Ideas from Bioinformatics Can Automate Finding Rhymes in Rap Music

Presented By: D. Brown, Associate Professor
From: Cheriton School of Computer Science, University of Waterloo
Biography: Dan Brown is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of Waterloo, where he has been since 2001.  From 2000 to 2001, he worked on the human and mouse genome projects at the Whitehead/MIT Center for Genome Research.  His interests are in algorithms for understanding the information in discrete sequences, particularly identifying patterns in DNA and protein sequences.

Sponsored By: G. Tzanetakis, Assistant Professor
From: Department of Computer Science

Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2010
Time: 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Location: Engineering and Computer Science Building (ECS), Room 660

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Transformational Lecture Series featuring Dale Mikkelson (Victoria) 10/21

October 18, 2009 at 12:44 pm (lecture)

Off-grid on a Mountain Top – UniverCity’s Journey Towards a Living Building

Dale is the manager of planning and sustainability for the UniverCity Project at Simon Fraser University’s Burnaby Mountain campus. The UniverCity community is being developed around “Four Cornerstones of Sustainability”, including Environment, Equity, Education, and Economy.  Mikkelsen and the Trust’s team are making significant and innovative contributions toward the creation of independent and universal green building standards to ensure a high level of urban design and environmental performance.  Mikkelsen is charged with raising the bar of sustainable community planning to ensure UniverCity remains on the leading edge of energy efficiency, material conservation, healthy environments and community building. Prior to working with SFU Community Trust, he was the lead project planner for the City of Vancouver’s 2010 Athlete’s Village. He also acted as the City’s Green Building Planner.

Doors open at 5:00pm, lecture starts at 5:30pm.

COST

Cascadia Members and students: Free
Non-members:
$10

October 21, 2009  from 05:00 pm to 06:30 pm

St. Ann’s Academy, 835 Humboldt Street, Victoria

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